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Is the Internet doomed as we know it?

December 31, 2013 // Posted in General, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Computer Crash

Is the Internet breaking apart?

 

The reason I ask this question is based on four important facts.

  • China’s Great Firewall segments the Chinese Internet so that the chinese have great difficulty accessing anything outside China.
  • Russia has now planned legislation so that Russian Internet users cannot access foreign services.
  • In November Germany  said that all communications between the German authorities would be fully enforced to stay within the country.
  • Brazil have also announced plans to create an alternative Internet channel so as not to go through the United States.

The Internet appears to be breaking up into national sectors. In addition, probably driven by the US’s interception and recording of personal transmissions over the Internet (spying in effect), more countries are considering restrictions within their national boundaries.

Countries appear not to want their information and citizens comments to be available outside their own countries any more, and with countries and continents now making restrictions to how the Internet can be used within their countries seems to be adding to the velocity of these actions. So this could be a killer for some businesses that get a lot of their income from sales outside their home country, if they are not allowed access to those customers any more their businesses will surely suffer.

You will be aware of the EU legislation, which initially insisted on explicit acceptance of cookies on EU targeted web sites, later watered down to implied acceptance. This created considerable confusion and concern from countries outside the EU, who wanted to reach the EU customers, but were not sure if they had to comply with the cookie legislation, hell, there was even more confusion within the EU as no one was clear on exactly what was required or expected. There are still many sites that do not comply with the legislation that should, but I have not yet heard of one warning or prosecution by the authorities. So what was that cookie stuff all about?

So over the coming year or years, I think we will see more of the Internet breaking up into national segments.

Then there is some other issues that will affect the Internet going forward.

The number of Cyber Attacks on big financial organisations are increasing and that’s likely to continue, with additional attacks on government organisations rising too.

Hacker’s lives are being made easier too, with more and more sensitive data being committed to the ‘Cloud’ it is without doubt more accessible to the devout hacker. In addition there are  hundreds of staff that are managing this ‘Cloud’ data in individual organisations. How do we know whether one or more of them that has access to this data, is not extracting it any selling it on or using it themselves for personal gain?

IMO it is best to keep data such as this securely in-house where it can be monitored and controlled effectively rather than store it on third party servers, where you really have no control at all, just their word that it is safe.

Phishing is also on the increase and no-one seems to be able to stop it or spamming.

So what is the future of the Internet for 2014?

Will it be anything like it is now in 2015?

 

 

 

Who is Google sharing your info with?

December 31, 2013 // Posted in General, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  1 Comment

Google

Google

I ask this question for one reason.

 

A short while a go, I was searching online for a Code signing certificate and was also looking at the hosting options currently available to see if there were any exceptional deals.

That was fine, did some searches and found some of what i was looking for.

Then I went into Facebook, now call this a co-incidence if you like, but I do not think there was any co-incidence at all. Google is sharing my information with Facebook!!

How do I know this?

Because now when I go into Facebook, I keep getting bombarded with adverts for SSL certificates and Hosting companies, and no there is no co-incidence about it, as I had never had an advert for SSL or Hosting on Facebook before, until I searched on Google for them.

If Google are sharing your browsing and search history with Facebook, what and with who else are they sharing?

Be aware and careful out there.

Steve

 

HTML5 and CSS3 OR NOT HTML5 and CSS3 Web Developer Dilemma

December 25, 2013 // Posted in Computer Tips, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

New Formats

New Formats

Dilemma for web site developers with HTML5 and CSS3.

 

As you are no doubt aware, HTML5, CSS3 and now a new version of jQuery that is aimed at HTML5 and CSS3 have been released and are now supported to some extent in the latest versions of major browsers. Also some Web authoring software has also been updated to use these, such as Serif WebPlus X7.

This is all well and good if you know that everyone that will use your web site has a browser that supports the latest HTML5 and CSS3 etc. But how can you determine that, the short answer is “You can’t”. This means that users with older browsers will not see your site as you intended it to look, and many, if you use the new CSS elements to identify form required fields etc, will not be able to use your forms for contact or submitting information. This is even more prevalent when it comes to mobile sites. How many mobile phone users do you know that update their phone software every time a new version is available?  I thought so, almost none! So they will still be using browsers equivalent to IE6 or 7, which have no support for the new html code.

There are also millions of PC users throughout the world that use IE6 and 7 browsers and other browsers that do not support HTML5 etc. So are you going to create a site that cannot be accessed by millions of potential visitors?  If your site is a retail business you could be losing a high percentage of your business.

Even the latest versions of all major browsers do not all support all of the new HTML5 and CSS3 functions, some support some and not other functions, and others support some different functions and not those that others do.

So which HTML5 and CSS3 features do you use? This is a question I cannot answer for you, you will have to make your own decision on this one.

And then there is the old IE thing, IE10 and IE11, although allegedly HTML5 and CSS3 compatible, has some major issues on formatting and extent of compliance, particularly with image compatibility on things like transparent pngs, text formatting, and JavaScript issues etc.

You you need to make some important decisions when you create your new web sites:

  • Do you target your sites at visitors with specific browsers? (IMO not a good idea.)
  • Do you create two sites, one for the new protocols and one that is compatible for the old protocols? (Also probably not a good idea unless the extra work involved is not a problem.)
  • If you choose the above, do you include a script that automatically detects the browser and switches accordingly, or do you ask the user to select a version?
  • Do you stick with the earlier versions of HTML and CSS3 code and stay compatible with most browsers? (Maybe a good choice for the time being until the percentage of users with later versions of browsers increases substantially)

The other issue is the latest jQuery, which has many changed functions and code. I did see a statement that said it was backward compatible with older versions, but trust me when I say that it is not. I have found this out after spending hours trying to find out why things that used to work fine have all of a sudden stopped working.

WebPlus X7, for example now uses the later version of jQuery, and if you have say, a webplus light box on your page the later version of jQuery is then added.

You then add features from jquery-ui 1.7,1.8 etc not adding jquery as WebPlus has already added it for the light box, and the jquery-ui functions no longer work. So you either have to use the later jquery-ui (which doesn’t allow some of the functions of the older versions – bah!) or manually add a different system for light boxes and the earlier jquery manually.

Other third party tools also present a similar issue as many were developed before the new version of jQuery was released.

So if you find that things suddenly do not work when you upgrade your site to HTML5, CSS3 and/or the Latest version of jQuery, perhaps now you will have an idea of where to start looking, and not have to spend hours trying to locate the issues as I have recently.

I hope that this post helps someone in some way.

 

Steve

 

 

 

Are your Facebook Posts not being seen?

December 22, 2013 // Posted in Computer Tips, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

#facebook

#facebook

You may have noticed that recently your posts on facebook are not being seen by many people.

There is an explanation for this.

Facebook announced recently that users posts will not be seen by all ‘page likers’ unless you pay for them to be seen, and the numbers of people who do see them will keep reducing over the coming months.

In some cases no-one will see your posts.

Whilst this is OK for businesses that are selling something as they should pay for the service, when you are posting free content or your personal posts, facebook are now saying that you too will have to pay if you want your posts to be seen. You may have noticed the number of pop-ups that have started to appear with messages such as “Boost your post for only XXX.XX”, “Reach more people…”  etc.

Facebook can of course do whatever they want, after all it is their system, but this may lead to many users leaving facebook, if their posts are not seen by anyone, after all what’s the point of posting stuff that only you will see?

I, for one, am not going to pay facebook for people to view my personal posts or free content posts, so am now looking at other alternatives to share my posts, such as Google+, and will post more on my blogs. I am also going to set up a mailing list so that my ‘page likers’ can subscribe and have my content delivered to their inboxes.

If you do not want to pay facebook for people to be able to view your posts, then you may also want to consider the alternatives.

I hope that this post has helped you understand why your posts reach on facebook have reduced substantially, and will allow you to find alternatives before your posts are just for you to see.

Steve

www.richosoft.co.uk

www.myphpsite.co.uk

 

The Dummies Guide to being a Moron on the Internet

December 8, 2013 // Posted in General, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Dummies Guide

Dummies Guide

How to be an absolute moron on the Internet

The Process in 10 Easy Steps

STEP 1

Go to Google, Yahoo and any other free email services and set up hundreds of new email addresses. You will need some that are absolutely meaningless like QwvFHJH@gmail.com and some that will be useful in later steps such as barclaysbank.custserv@hotmail.com.

 

 

STEP 2

Scan internet pages for email addresses, and save them in a database for future steps, or better still set up a web bot to do it for you, it can get them while you are sleeping then.

STEP 3 (Optional)
Write a facebook app and call it something like CityVille or FarmVille or similar, you will be able to get your hands on millions of emails and post to millions of walls once you have got this.
STEP 4

Find some free web hosts and get some web space, get a domain name that means nothing like qtyrew.com and set up some sub domains like paypal.admin.qtyrew.com so they look like they belong to PayPal, banks etc.

STEP 5
Use the email addresses you set up in Step 1 to send emails out to all the addresses you got in step 2, telling them that you have access to millions of dollars and want to get it out of your country and ask them to send their bank details to you. You could also send out some saying you are from a bank or paypal (see how useful that barclaysbank.custserv@hotmail.com is going to be) telling them to enter their login details onto a page you set up on the webspace in STEP 4.   You won’t get many people that fall for it but if just 1 out of a million emails sent does, it must be worth it, yes?
Repeat Step 5 a short while later in case they didn’t reply, and again a short while later, it might work.
STEP 6
Join an affiliate program for a sex site, online drug shop or cheap loans company or the like.
STEP 7
Visit every bulletin board,blog or forum on the Internet, or better still set up a web bot to do it for you, and post links to the sites you are affiliated to. Don’t forget to add your affiliate ID or you won’t get paid if some other moron actually clicks your link and makes a purchase.
STEP 8
Use the affiliate links you got in step 6 in emails to send out to all the addresses you got in step 2. Use a different email address, one of the ones you set up in step 1, to the one you used for other scams and phishes.
STEP 9

Remember that app you set up in Facebook? Well by now it has collected hundreds of email addresses, user names and granted you access to millions of users walls and news feeds. Fill your boots!

Send out links using the affiliate links you got in step 8 to all of their news feeds, with a message something like ‘This user Likes xxxx. Click the link to view’.
What the hell, you might as well send emails like you sent in step 5, to all of these too, got to have half a chance with these, after all they were dumb enough to use your app!
STEP 10
After all this, if you haven’t made any money, and frankly, there’s not much chance you will, but at least you’ve pissed off a lot of people, and that’s probably the police at your door now, you could always try and sell all the email addresses you have gleaned to some other moron who’s thinking of trying the same things.
Hope you enjoy.
Steve
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