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SEO Principles

May 24, 2014 // Posted in General, Main, Tips and Tricks (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Google

Google

Search Engine Optimisation is key to your site being found on the Internet.

SEO is your way of improving your website’s ranking in Google, Yahoo, and Bing. The more time and possibly money (if employing an external management  company) you spend on SEO, the more chance you will have of being the first search result listed by Google – which is the ultimate goal of any website and to be easily found by your potential customers.

The simplest technique is by altering the text, or ‘content’ on your website. To do this you must first understand your website’s target audience, who are they and what words will they type into Google when they are looking for this particular service or product?  There are of course many possibilities, and it is important to investigate those options and compile a list of your best appropriate keywords and phrases.

Once your keywords and phrases have been researched, your content can then be re-structured effectively so that it is ‘optimized’ and SEO friendly. You can have professional help with this, so talk to an SEO specialist company about what they would recommend. Other important actions include linking, (both internally – from your own site, and externally – other websites providing good linksto yours preferably from PR3 or higher sites) and implementing meta-tags, sub-headings, and website descriptions on all of your web pages. Content is king, so your success will be determined by the quality and relevance of your page content.

Important SEO principles  like ‘Black Hat’ and ‘White Hat’ SEO strategies. These two are very different  and it helps to understand the differences between them before talking to an SEO company about tactics for your website so you can make the right decisions.

‘White Hat’ SEO companies will use or recommend good design, good relevant content and appropriate linking. These will achieve longer lasting results and ranking.

‘Black Hat’ SEO companies, on the other hand will use underhand and inappropriate tactics to get fast results but at the expense of long term strategies and a sustainable website. They will hide bulk keyword text by using a background colour the same as the text so the text doesn’t display, or use font-colours to do the same or very small font sixes so that the text is not readable by humans. This will result in an immediate increase in ranking initially in some cases, but it won’t be very long before the search engines start imposing penalties on those sites and may even remove them from their search results completely.

So if you choose to use an external SEO company, be aware of these two types of SEO companies and ensure you choose the right one.

Keep up to date with what search engines are considering when ranking web site pages and adjust your content accordingly regularly to keep your site high in the rankings.

Also make sure you re-submit your site map to search engines regularly, and every time you make major changes to your site to keep your search results accurate and not link to now non-existing pages or content.

 

 

Slow Internet and Jerky Flash Videos in 7?

May 21, 2014 // Posted in Computer Tips, Main, Tips and Tricks (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Slow PC?

Slow Internet?

Do you have a DSL or Fiber connection advertised as fast but still getting slow responses in 7 and particularly jerky flash videos?

If the answer is yes, then here is something to try. It worked for me.

First of all check the state of your TCP/IP. To do this open a command prompt at Administrator Level.

To check the current state,

Type at the command prompt:

netsh int tcp show global

and Press Enter

and you will see something like (Save a copy of your details so you can revert to the original settings if required):

origtcp

We need to get that so it reads :

getto

 

So let’s enforce any user-set TCP Window auto-tunning level by typing netsh int tcp set heuristics disabled at the command prompt and press Enter. You should get an OK message.

Next let’s disable the auto-tuning level by typing

netsh int tcp set global autotuninglevel=disabled

at the command prompt and again press Enter. You should once again get an OK message.

Now we will improve the throughput setting by enabling CTCP, type

netsh int tcp set global congestionprovider=ctcp

at the command prompt and press Enter. Check you get an OK message again.

Now we will change the ECN (Explicit Congestion Notification) by typing

netsh int tcp set global ecncapability=default

at the command prompt and press Enter. You should get an OK message again.

Next we will change the receive-side scaling setting by typing

netsh int tcp set global rss=enabled

at the command prompt and press Enter.

Then we set the TCP Chimney Offload: by typing

netsh int tcp set global chimney=enabled

at the command prompt and press Enter.

Finally we set the Direct Cache Access (DCA) by typing

netsh int tcp set global dca=enabled

at the command prompt and press Enter.

Check the new settings by again typing

netsh int tcp show global

and press Enter  and you should now see:

getto

Close the command prompt by typing Exit and press Enter.

It may take a little while for the changes to take effect if you do not re-start your computer.

Here are a few notes on each section should you wish to revert ti your original settings.

Windows Scaling heuristics

Windows 7 has the ability to automatically change its own TCP Window auto-tuning behavior to a more conservative state regardless of any user settings. It is possible for Windows to override the autotuninlevel even after an user sets their custom TCP auto-tuning level.

possible settings are: disabled,enabled,default (sets to the Windows default state)
recommended: disabled (to retain user-set auto-tuning level)

TCP Auto-Tuning

The default auto-tuning level is “normal”, and the possible settings for the above command are:

disabled: uses a fixed value for the tcp receive window. Limits it to 64KB (limited at 65535).
highlyrestricted: allows the receive window to grow beyond its default value, very conservatively
restricted: somewhat restricted growth of the tcp receive window beyond its default value
normal: default value, allows the receive window to grow to accommodate most conditions
experimental: allows the receive window to grow to accommodate extreme scenarios (not recommended, it can degrade performance in common scenarios, only intended for research purposes. It enables RWIN values of over 16 MB)

Compound TCP – Improve throughput
Add-On Congestion Control Provider

The traditional slow-start and congestion avoidance algorithms in TCP help avoid network congestion by gradually increasing the TCP window at the beginning of transfers until the TCP Receive Window boundary is reached, or packet loss occurs. For broadband internet connections that combine high TCP Window with higher latency (high BDP), these algorithms do not increase the TCP windows fast enough to fully utilize the bandwidth of the connection.

Compound TCP (CTCP) is a newer method, available in 7. CTCP increases the TCP send window more aggressively for broadband connections (with large RWIN and BDP). CTCP attempts to maximize throughput by monitoring delay variations and >packet loss. It also ensures that its behavior does not impact other TCP connections negatively.

By default, Windows 7 has CTCP turned off, it is only on by default under Server 2008. Turning this option on can significantly increase throughput and packet loss recovery.

Possible options are:  ctcp, none, default (restores the system default value).

ECN Capability

ECN (Explicit Congestion Notification, RFC 3168) is a mechanism that provides routers with an alternate method of communicating network congestion. It is aimed to decrease retransmissions. In essence, ECN assumes that the cause of any packet loss is router congestion. It allows routers experiencing congestion to mark packets and allow clients to automatically lower their transfer rate to prevent further packet loss. Traditionally, TCP/IP networks signal congestion by dropping packets. When ECN is successfully negotiated, an ECN-aware router may set a bit in the IP header (in the DiffServ field) instead of dropping a packet in order to signal congestion. The receiver echoes the congestion indication to the sender, which must react as though a packet drop were detected.

ECN is disabled by default in 7 and other modern TCP/IP implementations, as it is possible that it may cause problems with some outdated routers that drop packets with the ECN bit set, rather than ignoring the bit. To check whether your router supports ECN, you can use the Microsoft Internet Connectivity Evaluation Tool. The results will be displayed under “Traffic Congestion Test”.
Possible settings are: enabled, disabled, default (restores the state to the system default).
The default state is: disabled
Recommendation: enabled (only for short-lived, interactive connections and HTTP requests with routers that support it, in the presense of congestion/packet loss), disabled otherwise (for pure bulk throughput with large TCP Window, no regular congestion/packet loss, or outdated routers without ECN support).

 

RSS – Receive-side Scaling

The receive-side scaling setting enables parallelized processing of received packets on multiple processors, while avoiding packet reordering. It avoids packet reordering separating packets into “flows”, and using a single processor for processing all the packets for a given flow. Packets are separated into flows by computing a hash value based on specific fields in each packet, and the resulting hash values are used to select a processor for processing the flow. This approach ensures that all packets belonging to a given TCP connection will be queued to the same processor, in the same order that they were received by the network adapter.

Possible rss settings are: disabled, enabled, default (restores rss state to the system default).
Default state is: enabled
Recommended: enabled (if you have 2 or more processor cores and a NIC that can handle RSS)

TCP Chimney Offload

TCP chimney offload enables Windows to offload all TCP processing for a connection to a network adapter. Offloads are initiated on a per-connection basis. Compared to task offload, TCP chimney offload further reduces networking-related CPU overhead, enabling better overall system performance by freeing up CPU time for other tasks.

The possible states are disabled, enabled,  automatic (only Windows 7 and 2008 Server) as follows:
automatic – This default setting is only available under Windows 7 and 2008 Server. It offloads if the connection is 10 GbE, has a RTT < 20ms, and the connection has exchanged at least 130KB of data. The device driver must also have TCP Chimney enabled.
default – this setting restores chimney offload to the system default. Setting this “default” state under Windows 7 and 2008 Server is possible, but it sets the system to the “automatic” mode described above.
disabled – this setting is maually configured as disabled.
enabled – this setting is manually configured as enabled.

I hope you find this useful.

Steve

 

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