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Norton have got it very wrong with WS.Reputation.1 detection

April 15, 2017 // Posted in General, Main, Uncategorized (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Norton's WS.Reputation.1 detection Notice

Norton’s WS.Reputation.1 detection Notice

The way Norton’s WS.Reputation.1 detection works is the most ridiculous thing I have ever seen in an anti-virus protection program.

 

If someone creates a new program or a new update to an existing program, and only a few people that use Norton have the file or it has only just been built, then Norton immediately deletes it and reports it as a threat without any checks on the file for malware.

Now if that isn’t ridiculous then I don’t know what is. It means that every new program that is first added to a user’s PC that is running Norton gets flagged as a threat for no reason at all.

Here is an extract from Norton’s write-up:

“WS.Reputation.1 is a detection for files that have a low reputation score based on analyzing data from Symantec’s community of users and therefore are likely to be security risks. Detections of this type are based on Symantec’s reputation-based security technology. Because this detection is based on a reputation score, it does not represent a specific class of threat like adware or spyware, but instead applies to all threat categories. 

The reputation-based system uses “the wisdom of crowds” (Symantec’s tens of millions of end users) connected to cloud-based intelligence to compute a reputation score for an application, and in the process identify malicious software in an entirely new way beyond traditional signatures and behavior-based detection techniques.”

They themselves say that Because this detection is based on a reputation score, it does not represent a specific class of threat , So they think that the file is not necessarily a threat, but delete it any way, just in case! DUH!  That IMO, is not the way antivirus protection should work. It should only identify a real threat that can be proven as a threat, that’s how all other antivirus programs work.

So it sees how many Norton users are using the file and when it was created to make it’s decission? DUH! That means that as it is deleted immediately by Norton, the number of Norton users will never increase so the ‘Reputation’ score will never change. So how can you increase the reputation score?

I myself have recently created a new small program and had this situation with users and have had to refund their purchases because Norton says my installer is a threat. My software is checked by an independent source before distribution with 61 different anti-virus engines and all report they are CLEAN. I have been developing small software applications for 25 years and have never had any issues with my programs they are all malware free and to have Norton now start saying they are a threat is deformation of my character and must be illegal to falsely claim a developer’s products are malicious.

This ridiculous identification is ruining the reputation of small developers as every new program they develop and set up on a PC running Norton, is immediately deleted and flagged as being a threat, when there is no threat at all. Most users will believe Norton and then never take the steps (which are not simple) to get around the Norton false detection.

This needs to be addressed by Norton Now! It is ruining the good reputation of small developers because Norton is saying their software is a risk when it is perfectly safe and no risk at all.

If you are experiencing these issues with Norton please comment below.

regards

Steve

PayPal Security changes September 2016

March 25, 2016 // Posted in General, Main, Tips and Tricks (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Important PayPal changes you need to be aware of if you are using PayPal on your site:

 

PayPal are updating their Merchant security in September 2016, and it means that when sending transaction data to an IPN etc it will only communicate with secure connections (https://).

This means that you will need to update any scripts that currently use a non-encrypted connection such as IPN’s and will need to install an SSL on your server, if you do not already have one.

You need to also check that your php server supports HTTP1.1 and OpenSSL1.0.1 or higher:

You can check this using phpinfo:

I hope you find this useful,

regards

Steve

Ransomware Operation Taken Down by Cisco

October 7, 2015 // Posted in General, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Computer Hi-Jacked?

Computer Hi-Jacked?

A ransomware operation that it is estimated netted $30million a year by installing ransom software on unsuspecting users computers has been disrupted by security researches at Cisco.

The Angler Exploit kit, also known as the hack-by-numbers tool is sold in underground crime forums to people who don’t want to go through the hassle of developing and testing exploits themselves. Angler has the ability to successfully infect an estimated 40 percent of the end users it targets using attack code that surreptitiously exploits vulnerabilities in browsers and browser plugins. In many cases, the security flaws have already been patched, but, in some cases the kits exploit zero-day vulnerabilities for which there is no currently available fix.

A large number of infected users were connecting to servers operated by service provider Limestone Networks. With the co-operation of Limestone and examining some of the servers they found that the single operation was targeting as many as 90,000 users a day.

“This is a significant blow to the emerging hacker economy where ransomware and the black market sale of stolen IP, credit card info and personally identifiable information  are generating hundreds of millions of dollars annually, Talos researchers wrote in a eport about the takedown.

More information at http://talosintel.com/angler-exposed/

My Experiences of Windows 10 and Privacy Issues

August 14, 2015 // Posted in Computer Tips, General, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

The best one yet

‘The best one yet’??

 

Ok, so I have been using Windows 10 for several days now and here are some of the issues I have found.

First of all there is the Windows Updates: When Windows 10 performs updates on close down, you do not get the old familiar Windows 7 messages “Installing Update x of xx, do not switch off your PC”, instead you just get a Black Screen with continuous hard drive activity, and it is easy to just hit the power switch thinking nothing is happening.

Then theres the Memory issues: One of which cause images to become just Black Squares in apps and thumbnails and icons, some browsers just go black when there a lot of images on a page. Now whether this is a Video Card Driver that Win 10 installed, or a memory management problem in Windows 10, I have yet to ascertain,  but I keep getting an error on shutdown that is something like “Access Violation, Memory error, windows is trying to access an invalid memory location”, which I never got on Windows 7.

Then there’s the Privacy Issues:  Some Windows 10 features, such as Cortana and Bing search, continue sending data to Microsoft, even when they are turned off. Some apps and services will communicate with the Microsoft servers, even when you tell them not to by the individual software’s privacy settings.

For example: Windows 10 will periodically send data, purported to be used for OneDrive,  for reasons unknown, even on a local account that isn’t connected to a Microsoft account. Why it is being sent is a mystery.

In at least one case, it has been found that information that can identify the user is also sent.

Cortana, will send data to Microsoft, even if it is disabled, and that data contains a computer ID that allows Microsoft to determine all the Cortana requests from the same computer.

And what’s more some of these connections would connect to Microsoft’s servers through unencrypted channels.

IMO, If you disable these services as you don’t want to use them, then that should really disable them and any data they would transmit.

Upgrading Windows 7 to Windows 10

July 31, 2015 // Posted in Computer Tips, General, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  1 Comment

The best one yet

‘The best one yet’??

My experience of upgrading from Win 7 to Windows 10:

 

‘The Best One Yet’ is Microsoft’s claim but is that really true?

Well I was all excited when I received my ‘Update is ready to Install’ message and had already read some of the claims for this important day.

  • Takes about 1 hour to update.
  • Get Cortana for Windows.
  • All your software will be available.
  • We will automatically update your Antivirus Software.
  • The best one yet.

But the problems started well before this day, as Microsoft said you will get an icon in your taskbar to claim and install your free upgrade if your current version is a legal version.

Well that failed straight away as I didn’t get my icon in the task bar. So after some checking, it appeared you had to install an Optional Update from Windows Update, (they said it was automatic), and you had to be running IE 11, mine was IE10, so that wasn’t mentioned. When I installed the optional update and IE11 I did eventually get my update icon in the taskbar. On clicking it said your computer is compatible with Windows 10 and all your software will run with Windows 10. That sounded positive.

Ok the ‘Your Upload is Ready’ button appeared, so I restarted windows to begin the install. After about 30 minutes of no apparent progress, the PC re-booted and there it was, Windows 7, as it was before. That was not expected, I expected a nice new Windows 10.

OK let’s try again.

In order to start again it had to re-download the update files (why, when it already had them), so a 2+ hour wait while it downloaded the 2+GB of files, and the ‘Your Update is ready to install’ again. So off we go.

Again after 30 minutes of what appeared to be doing nothing (but the hard drive light was going crazy), and the PC rebooted and hooray, Windows 7 again.

OK let’s check the update status, “Update failed error code –    failed code 80240020

What is this mysterious error code 80240020 (Why can’t make error messages meaningful, like ‘Could not do this or that’ instead of error Code 80240020?

Ok so it seems an issue with Windows Update so the solution might be to reset Windows Update:

So:

  • went to C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution\Download and deleted everything in the folder (not the folder).
  • open a command prompt with run as administrator and type wuauclt.exe /updatenow and hit enter, then type exit and hit enter again.
  • Go to windows update and The Windows 10 update is downloading again!! Another two hours.

After the download, the ‘Your update is ready’ message again, so another re-boot, 30 minutes of hard drive activity, but this time a message saying ‘Windows is configuring your updates 5%….’ etc. Perhaps this is a good sign?

After about 1 hour (remember Microsoft claiming the Update will take approx 1 hour’? Well we are at about 7 hours now already, and it isn’t because I have a slow machine, I have a Intel quad core processor with each processor running at up to 3.2GHz), another auto reboot and a new screen, looks like we are getting somewhere now, a big circle in the middle of the screen shows the current progress, this stayed on 1% for over 20 minutes. Almost 3 hours and 4 reboots  later 100%, Yay ..

Another re-boot and a new welcome screen, logged in and, and, and just a black screen, better not do anything as the hard drive is doing something, goodness knows what. One hour later windows started (perhaps this is the One Hour Microsoft was talking about?

Then another message ‘We are updating some settings and apps for you’, after another 40 minutes ‘This is taking a little longer than usual – please wait’ , eventually the message changed to ‘Almost there now’ , wait, wait, wait.

Eventually a bright new windows 10 interface. (Looks pretty similar to Win 7, with a few display enhancements, perhaps that was why 7 could be upgraded and not a new install?).

Now the fun begins, remember Microsoft said , we will set up your programs for you and update your current anti-virus software? And they said my programs were all compatible with Win 10. Nuh. Windows 10 removed my antivirus software (AVG) and PC TuneUp (AVG) completely.

Tried a repair on them as they both still appeared in the Add/Remove programs, and although they both said successful, they both failed. So uninstalled both and re-installed, and eventually they are working.

I haven’t yet checked all programs, to see if they are all there, not very confident that they will be.

Ah Hah, just remembered, let’s try out Cortana or whatever it’s called, they say you must have an English System (Check), your region must be set to Uk,US etc (Check set to UK), try to access Cortana, message “You cannot use Cortana in your Region”), I live in Thailand., but my region is set to UK as is my language, and these are the requirements Microsoft says, so it looks as though it looks at your IP address and blocks it on that. So does that mean that if you have active Cortana in the UK if you take a trip to another unsupported region (by IP address) Cortana doesn’t come with you?

Then there’s the new Edge Shop – Can’t get that to work for love nor money, for free items, just keeps saying try again later.

It’s not going well is it?

Then there’s the unconfigurable display interface, the squared forms with no borders etc that are not very elegant or appealing, IMO, and no way to change them like in 7 and earlier versions.

There was another claim about Windows 10 that Microsoft made, ‘it’s Faster’ – Sorry Microsoft – I have to disagree there, it is much slower starting up that Win 7, programs load slower, Win 10 uses much more memory (and 32 bit still not able to use more than 4GB), which means the disk cache is used more and again slows things down.

So I am not that impressed as yet, and certainly think the “The best Yet’ is not a totally true statement.

I will now have a play for a few days and post again once I have fully tested it. Watch this Space!

Steve

 

 

 

 

 

SEO Principles

May 24, 2014 // Posted in General, Main, Tips and Tricks (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Google

Google

Search Engine Optimisation is key to your site being found on the Internet.

SEO is your way of improving your website’s ranking in Google, Yahoo, and Bing. The more time and possibly money (if employing an external management  company) you spend on SEO, the more chance you will have of being the first search result listed by Google – which is the ultimate goal of any website and to be easily found by your potential customers.

The simplest technique is by altering the text, or ‘content’ on your website. To do this you must first understand your website’s target audience, who are they and what words will they type into Google when they are looking for this particular service or product?  There are of course many possibilities, and it is important to investigate those options and compile a list of your best appropriate keywords and phrases.

Once your keywords and phrases have been researched, your content can then be re-structured effectively so that it is ‘optimized’ and SEO friendly. You can have professional help with this, so talk to an SEO specialist company about what they would recommend. Other important actions include linking, (both internally – from your own site, and externally – other websites providing good linksto yours preferably from PR3 or higher sites) and implementing meta-tags, sub-headings, and website descriptions on all of your web pages. Content is king, so your success will be determined by the quality and relevance of your page content.

Important SEO principles  like ‘Black Hat’ and ‘White Hat’ SEO strategies. These two are very different  and it helps to understand the differences between them before talking to an SEO company about tactics for your website so you can make the right decisions.

‘White Hat’ SEO companies will use or recommend good design, good relevant content and appropriate linking. These will achieve longer lasting results and ranking.

‘Black Hat’ SEO companies, on the other hand will use underhand and inappropriate tactics to get fast results but at the expense of long term strategies and a sustainable website. They will hide bulk keyword text by using a background colour the same as the text so the text doesn’t display, or use font-colours to do the same or very small font sixes so that the text is not readable by humans. This will result in an immediate increase in ranking initially in some cases, but it won’t be very long before the search engines start imposing penalties on those sites and may even remove them from their search results completely.

So if you choose to use an external SEO company, be aware of these two types of SEO companies and ensure you choose the right one.

Keep up to date with what search engines are considering when ranking web site pages and adjust your content accordingly regularly to keep your site high in the rankings.

Also make sure you re-submit your site map to search engines regularly, and every time you make major changes to your site to keep your search results accurate and not link to now non-existing pages or content.

 

 

Slow Internet and Jerky Flash Videos in 7?

May 21, 2014 // Posted in Computer Tips, Main, Tips and Tricks (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Slow PC?

Slow Internet?

Do you have a DSL or Fiber connection advertised as fast but still getting slow responses in 7 and particularly jerky flash videos?

If the answer is yes, then here is something to try. It worked for me.

First of all check the state of your TCP/IP. To do this open a command prompt at Administrator Level.

To check the current state,

Type at the command prompt:

netsh int tcp show global

and Press Enter

and you will see something like (Save a copy of your details so you can revert to the original settings if required):

origtcp

We need to get that so it reads :

getto

 

So let’s enforce any user-set TCP Window auto-tunning level by typing netsh int tcp set heuristics disabled at the command prompt and press Enter. You should get an OK message.

Next let’s disable the auto-tuning level by typing

netsh int tcp set global autotuninglevel=disabled

at the command prompt and again press Enter. You should once again get an OK message.

Now we will improve the throughput setting by enabling CTCP, type

netsh int tcp set global congestionprovider=ctcp

at the command prompt and press Enter. Check you get an OK message again.

Now we will change the ECN (Explicit Congestion Notification) by typing

netsh int tcp set global ecncapability=default

at the command prompt and press Enter. You should get an OK message again.

Next we will change the receive-side scaling setting by typing

netsh int tcp set global rss=enabled

at the command prompt and press Enter.

Then we set the TCP Chimney Offload: by typing

netsh int tcp set global chimney=enabled

at the command prompt and press Enter.

Finally we set the Direct Cache Access (DCA) by typing

netsh int tcp set global dca=enabled

at the command prompt and press Enter.

Check the new settings by again typing

netsh int tcp show global

and press Enter  and you should now see:

getto

Close the command prompt by typing Exit and press Enter.

It may take a little while for the changes to take effect if you do not re-start your computer.

Here are a few notes on each section should you wish to revert ti your original settings.

Windows Scaling heuristics

Windows 7 has the ability to automatically change its own TCP Window auto-tuning behavior to a more conservative state regardless of any user settings. It is possible for Windows to override the autotuninlevel even after an user sets their custom TCP auto-tuning level.

possible settings are: disabled,enabled,default (sets to the Windows default state)
recommended: disabled (to retain user-set auto-tuning level)

TCP Auto-Tuning

The default auto-tuning level is “normal”, and the possible settings for the above command are:

disabled: uses a fixed value for the tcp receive window. Limits it to 64KB (limited at 65535).
highlyrestricted: allows the receive window to grow beyond its default value, very conservatively
restricted: somewhat restricted growth of the tcp receive window beyond its default value
normal: default value, allows the receive window to grow to accommodate most conditions
experimental: allows the receive window to grow to accommodate extreme scenarios (not recommended, it can degrade performance in common scenarios, only intended for research purposes. It enables RWIN values of over 16 MB)

Compound TCP – Improve throughput
Add-On Congestion Control Provider

The traditional slow-start and congestion avoidance algorithms in TCP help avoid network congestion by gradually increasing the TCP window at the beginning of transfers until the TCP Receive Window boundary is reached, or packet loss occurs. For broadband internet connections that combine high TCP Window with higher latency (high BDP), these algorithms do not increase the TCP windows fast enough to fully utilize the bandwidth of the connection.

Compound TCP (CTCP) is a newer method, available in 7. CTCP increases the TCP send window more aggressively for broadband connections (with large RWIN and BDP). CTCP attempts to maximize throughput by monitoring delay variations and >packet loss. It also ensures that its behavior does not impact other TCP connections negatively.

By default, Windows 7 has CTCP turned off, it is only on by default under Server 2008. Turning this option on can significantly increase throughput and packet loss recovery.

Possible options are:  ctcp, none, default (restores the system default value).

ECN Capability

ECN (Explicit Congestion Notification, RFC 3168) is a mechanism that provides routers with an alternate method of communicating network congestion. It is aimed to decrease retransmissions. In essence, ECN assumes that the cause of any packet loss is router congestion. It allows routers experiencing congestion to mark packets and allow clients to automatically lower their transfer rate to prevent further packet loss. Traditionally, TCP/IP networks signal congestion by dropping packets. When ECN is successfully negotiated, an ECN-aware router may set a bit in the IP header (in the DiffServ field) instead of dropping a packet in order to signal congestion. The receiver echoes the congestion indication to the sender, which must react as though a packet drop were detected.

ECN is disabled by default in 7 and other modern TCP/IP implementations, as it is possible that it may cause problems with some outdated routers that drop packets with the ECN bit set, rather than ignoring the bit. To check whether your router supports ECN, you can use the Microsoft Internet Connectivity Evaluation Tool. The results will be displayed under “Traffic Congestion Test”.
Possible settings are: enabled, disabled, default (restores the state to the system default).
The default state is: disabled
Recommendation: enabled (only for short-lived, interactive connections and HTTP requests with routers that support it, in the presense of congestion/packet loss), disabled otherwise (for pure bulk throughput with large TCP Window, no regular congestion/packet loss, or outdated routers without ECN support).

 

RSS – Receive-side Scaling

The receive-side scaling setting enables parallelized processing of received packets on multiple processors, while avoiding packet reordering. It avoids packet reordering separating packets into “flows”, and using a single processor for processing all the packets for a given flow. Packets are separated into flows by computing a hash value based on specific fields in each packet, and the resulting hash values are used to select a processor for processing the flow. This approach ensures that all packets belonging to a given TCP connection will be queued to the same processor, in the same order that they were received by the network adapter.

Possible rss settings are: disabled, enabled, default (restores rss state to the system default).
Default state is: enabled
Recommended: enabled (if you have 2 or more processor cores and a NIC that can handle RSS)

TCP Chimney Offload

TCP chimney offload enables Windows to offload all TCP processing for a connection to a network adapter. Offloads are initiated on a per-connection basis. Compared to task offload, TCP chimney offload further reduces networking-related CPU overhead, enabling better overall system performance by freeing up CPU time for other tasks.

The possible states are disabled, enabled,  automatic (only Windows 7 and 2008 Server) as follows:
automatic – This default setting is only available under Windows 7 and 2008 Server. It offloads if the connection is 10 GbE, has a RTT < 20ms, and the connection has exchanged at least 130KB of data. The device driver must also have TCP Chimney enabled.
default – this setting restores chimney offload to the system default. Setting this “default” state under Windows 7 and 2008 Server is possible, but it sets the system to the “automatic” mode described above.
disabled – this setting is maually configured as disabled.
enabled – this setting is manually configured as enabled.

I hope you find this useful.

Steve

 

Its All About Position!

January 9, 2014 // Posted in Main, Tips and Tricks (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

triplepivotPosition is important in many things in life, work, football, cricket and even sex.

If you are not in the right position something will go wrong!

It is the same with code on your pages, particularly with jquery and jquery-ui.

How many times have you added an additional jquery widget to one of your pages only to find something else that used to work, no longer does.

I get many requests for help for exactly the same issue and see many posts on forums with the same problems. When you look at the responses that others have given, you will often see complicated modifications to javascript libraries, or lots of additional code or changes to code that are supposed to fix the issues, such as jquery noConflicts and the like. In some cases these do fix the immediate problem, but involve quite a bit of work and some require a reasonable knowledge of javascript coding.

In almost all of the situations I have been asked to help with, however, I have found the solution to be much simpler, it’s about position and what is loaded and when.

Before entering into any complicated code changes here is something to try first, it won’t  require any modifications to code or re-writing javascript libraries and even those with little or no javascript knowledge can make the changes.

Let’s imagine you have a javascript gallery on your page, this will require a jquery library, some code in the head of your page and some in the body, when using WebPlus these will be added automatically by the program and will not be moveable as WebPlus controls their location.  You now add a third party javascript add-on that tells you to add some code to the head of your page and some to the body, they will also tell you to include a jquery library and perhaps a jquery-ui library. Well first of all forget adding the jquery library if WebPlus has already added it’s own, as if there is two on the same page that will in itself cause conflicts.

Secondly if the code you added to the head for your third party contains $ signs to call functions in jquery etc then you will more than likely find that something will not work after you add it, either your javascript gallery or your new add-on.

Before you get into complicated modifications here is a tip when your new add-on causes issues with your currently working javascript add-on :

Firstly forget the old addage of ‘You must add your scripts to the head of your page’, that’s a load of twoddle.

Move the code that you added for your new add-on to the body of your page, firstly just after the body tag (in WebPlus paste it over the !– Page Body Start — tag), so that all your new code is below your original add-on’s code.

If that doesn’t get both working move your new code to just before the body end tag, (In WebPlus paste it over the — Page Body End — tag).

In most cases the above will fix the issue and both your add-ins will work happily together.

Sometimes you may have more than two add-ins on a page and one or another stops working when the additional ones are added. Play around with the position of each script on the page  until you get the right combination, and you will fix most conflicts with positions. Don’t forget to also check for duplicate libraries, and make sure that the libraries are loaded before any scripts that call them come into play, It’s all about position again.

As I said at the start I have found that most problems with javascript conflicts can be fixed with position of the scripts, so you can save yourself a lot of work by playing with positions before anything else.

I hope that this helps someone.

Steve

 

 

 

 

 

Cloud Computing – A Stupid Question?

January 3, 2014 // Posted in General, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

incloudsYou will probably think this is a stupid question, but what is the difference between cloud computing and what we already had?

 

I have been trying to get my head around this for some time now. Cloud computing is described as storing your data on a cloud (third party) server on the internet.

But if that is what cloud computing is then isn’t it the same as having your web space on a third party server and storing your data on a database server linked to your web space etc. You can also save all your files etc on that same server.

Obviously a cloud server is not really storing your data in a cloud, it would be very clever if it was. What happens when it rains, does your data come down with it?

Seriously though, if you have a shared hosting package on someone elses servers, or even have your own dedicated server in someone elses building, then your data is stored on a physical device not directly controlled by you but remotely accessed. Isn’t that the same as a Cloud Service? Your data is stored on a physical device in someone elses premises that you manage remotely.

How does one differ from the other? Are they both not the same?

DSCF0141DSCF0138My idea of cloud computing is more like my current method of connecting to the internet. Due to cabling issues my service provider connected me to their data centre some 2-3 miles away via a radio link and in order to be able to see the receiver/transmitter the other end, had to put up a 30ft plus pole, so my modem is ‘in the clouds’, now that’s what I call cloud computing.

 

Comments and answers welcomed

Steve

Santa has been and gone and you have a new device.

January 2, 2014 // Posted in Computer Tips, General, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

santagiftsYes Santa has been and gone and the festivities are now over.

 

You may have gotten a new device from Santa, but he forgot to include some very important items.

So if you did get a new device, a laptop, home PC, tablet, phone or other mobile device don’t forget to add the following important items:

  • Set up a master pin code or password so that if your device gets stolen or lost, the person that currently has it in their possession cannot use it easily.
  • Install anti-virus and anti-spam software to protect your device. I have tried many different AV programs over the years and I have found the best to be AVG Total Internet Security, it doesn’t add too much overhead to your system, always appears to install correctly first time, is updated automatically very regularly to keep you protected, and gives full protection. On Mobile devices the AVG solution is also very effective and adds additional feature which I will cover a little later.
  • If your new device is a mobile one with GPS, install location software, AVG’s mobile solution has this facility and will allow you to find out where your device is if it is lost or stolen.
  • Again if your device is mobile install remote wiping and locking software, so if your device goes missing you can set it to sound alarms if  someone attempts to use it, you can lock the device and even delete everything on it by issuing a command over the internet. These features are also available in AVG’s mobile solutions.
  • Many mobile devices allow purchase within Apps, make sure you turn these off so that you do not accidentally make purchases.
  • Check your privacy settings in all devices, laptops,PC’s and mobile devices, and make sure you are not sharing something you do not want to.

Protect yourself, as your device will not do it for you without the right additions.

Happy New Year and enjoy your new device safely.

Steve

 

 

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