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Norton have got it very wrong with WS.Reputation.1 detection

April 15, 2017 // Posted in General, Main, Uncategorized (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Norton's WS.Reputation.1 detection Notice

Norton’s WS.Reputation.1 detection Notice

The way Norton’s WS.Reputation.1 detection works is the most ridiculous thing I have ever seen in an anti-virus protection program.

 

If someone creates a new program or a new update to an existing program, and only a few people that use Norton have the file or it has only just been built, then Norton immediately deletes it and reports it as a threat without any checks on the file for malware.

Now if that isn’t ridiculous then I don’t know what is. It means that every new program that is first added to a user’s PC that is running Norton gets flagged as a threat for no reason at all.

Here is an extract from Norton’s write-up:

“WS.Reputation.1 is a detection for files that have a low reputation score based on analyzing data from Symantec’s community of users and therefore are likely to be security risks. Detections of this type are based on Symantec’s reputation-based security technology. Because this detection is based on a reputation score, it does not represent a specific class of threat like adware or spyware, but instead applies to all threat categories. 

The reputation-based system uses “the wisdom of crowds” (Symantec’s tens of millions of end users) connected to cloud-based intelligence to compute a reputation score for an application, and in the process identify malicious software in an entirely new way beyond traditional signatures and behavior-based detection techniques.”

They themselves say that Because this detection is based on a reputation score, it does not represent a specific class of threat , So they think that the file is not necessarily a threat, but delete it any way, just in case! DUH!  That IMO, is not the way antivirus protection should work. It should only identify a real threat that can be proven as a threat, that’s how all other antivirus programs work.

So it sees how many Norton users are using the file and when it was created to make it’s decission? DUH! That means that as it is deleted immediately by Norton, the number of Norton users will never increase so the ‘Reputation’ score will never change. So how can you increase the reputation score?

I myself have recently created a new small program and had this situation with users and have had to refund their purchases because Norton says my installer is a threat. My software is checked by an independent source before distribution with 61 different anti-virus engines and all report they are CLEAN. I have been developing small software applications for 25 years and have never had any issues with my programs they are all malware free and to have Norton now start saying they are a threat is deformation of my character and must be illegal to falsely claim a developer’s products are malicious.

This ridiculous identification is ruining the reputation of small developers as every new program they develop and set up on a PC running Norton, is immediately deleted and flagged as being a threat, when there is no threat at all. Most users will believe Norton and then never take the steps (which are not simple) to get around the Norton false detection.

This needs to be addressed by Norton Now! It is ruining the good reputation of small developers because Norton is saying their software is a risk when it is perfectly safe and no risk at all.

If you are experiencing these issues with Norton please comment below.

regards

Steve

HTML5 and CSS3 OR NOT HTML5 and CSS3 Web Developer Dilemma

December 25, 2013 // Posted in Computer Tips, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

New Formats

New Formats

Dilemma for web site developers with HTML5 and CSS3.

 

As you are no doubt aware, HTML5, CSS3 and now a new version of jQuery that is aimed at HTML5 and CSS3 have been released and are now supported to some extent in the latest versions of major browsers. Also some Web authoring software has also been updated to use these, such as Serif WebPlus X7.

This is all well and good if you know that everyone that will use your web site has a browser that supports the latest HTML5 and CSS3 etc. But how can you determine that, the short answer is “You can’t”. This means that users with older browsers will not see your site as you intended it to look, and many, if you use the new CSS elements to identify form required fields etc, will not be able to use your forms for contact or submitting information. This is even more prevalent when it comes to mobile sites. How many mobile phone users do you know that update their phone software every time a new version is available?  I thought so, almost none! So they will still be using browsers equivalent to IE6 or 7, which have no support for the new html code.

There are also millions of PC users throughout the world that use IE6 and 7 browsers and other browsers that do not support HTML5 etc. So are you going to create a site that cannot be accessed by millions of potential visitors?  If your site is a retail business you could be losing a high percentage of your business.

Even the latest versions of all major browsers do not all support all of the new HTML5 and CSS3 functions, some support some and not other functions, and others support some different functions and not those that others do.

So which HTML5 and CSS3 features do you use? This is a question I cannot answer for you, you will have to make your own decision on this one.

And then there is the old IE thing, IE10 and IE11, although allegedly HTML5 and CSS3 compatible, has some major issues on formatting and extent of compliance, particularly with image compatibility on things like transparent pngs, text formatting, and JavaScript issues etc.

You you need to make some important decisions when you create your new web sites:

  • Do you target your sites at visitors with specific browsers? (IMO not a good idea.)
  • Do you create two sites, one for the new protocols and one that is compatible for the old protocols? (Also probably not a good idea unless the extra work involved is not a problem.)
  • If you choose the above, do you include a script that automatically detects the browser and switches accordingly, or do you ask the user to select a version?
  • Do you stick with the earlier versions of HTML and CSS3 code and stay compatible with most browsers? (Maybe a good choice for the time being until the percentage of users with later versions of browsers increases substantially)

The other issue is the latest jQuery, which has many changed functions and code. I did see a statement that said it was backward compatible with older versions, but trust me when I say that it is not. I have found this out after spending hours trying to find out why things that used to work fine have all of a sudden stopped working.

WebPlus X7, for example now uses the later version of jQuery, and if you have say, a webplus light box on your page the later version of jQuery is then added.

You then add features from jquery-ui 1.7,1.8 etc not adding jquery as WebPlus has already added it for the light box, and the jquery-ui functions no longer work. So you either have to use the later jquery-ui (which doesn’t allow some of the functions of the older versions – bah!) or manually add a different system for light boxes and the earlier jquery manually.

Other third party tools also present a similar issue as many were developed before the new version of jQuery was released.

So if you find that things suddenly do not work when you upgrade your site to HTML5, CSS3 and/or the Latest version of jQuery, perhaps now you will have an idea of where to start looking, and not have to spend hours trying to locate the issues as I have recently.

I hope that this post helps someone in some way.

 

Steve

 

 

 

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