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Norton have got it very wrong with WS.Reputation.1 detection

April 15, 2017 // Posted in General, Main, Uncategorized (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

Norton's WS.Reputation.1 detection Notice

Norton’s WS.Reputation.1 detection Notice

The way Norton’s WS.Reputation.1 detection works is the most ridiculous thing I have ever seen in an anti-virus protection program.

 

If someone creates a new program or a new update to an existing program, and only a few people that use Norton have the file or it has only just been built, then Norton immediately deletes it and reports it as a threat without any checks on the file for malware.

Now if that isn’t ridiculous then I don’t know what is. It means that every new program that is first added to a user’s PC that is running Norton gets flagged as a threat for no reason at all.

Here is an extract from Norton’s write-up:

“WS.Reputation.1 is a detection for files that have a low reputation score based on analyzing data from Symantec’s community of users and therefore are likely to be security risks. Detections of this type are based on Symantec’s reputation-based security technology. Because this detection is based on a reputation score, it does not represent a specific class of threat like adware or spyware, but instead applies to all threat categories. 

The reputation-based system uses “the wisdom of crowds” (Symantec’s tens of millions of end users) connected to cloud-based intelligence to compute a reputation score for an application, and in the process identify malicious software in an entirely new way beyond traditional signatures and behavior-based detection techniques.”

They themselves say that Because this detection is based on a reputation score, it does not represent a specific class of threat , So they think that the file is not necessarily a threat, but delete it any way, just in case! DUH!  That IMO, is not the way antivirus protection should work. It should only identify a real threat that can be proven as a threat, that’s how all other antivirus programs work.

So it sees how many Norton users are using the file and when it was created to make it’s decission? DUH! That means that as it is deleted immediately by Norton, the number of Norton users will never increase so the ‘Reputation’ score will never change. So how can you increase the reputation score?

I myself have recently created a new small program and had this situation with users and have had to refund their purchases because Norton says my installer is a threat. My software is checked by an independent source before distribution with 61 different anti-virus engines and all report they are CLEAN. I have been developing small software applications for 25 years and have never had any issues with my programs they are all malware free and to have Norton now start saying they are a threat is deformation of my character and must be illegal to falsely claim a developer’s products are malicious.

This ridiculous identification is ruining the reputation of small developers as every new program they develop and set up on a PC running Norton, is immediately deleted and flagged as being a threat, when there is no threat at all. Most users will believe Norton and then never take the steps (which are not simple) to get around the Norton false detection.

This needs to be addressed by Norton Now! It is ruining the good reputation of small developers because Norton is saying their software is a risk when it is perfectly safe and no risk at all.

If you are experiencing these issues with Norton please comment below.

regards

Steve

Bye Bye Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 next Tuesday

January 7, 2016 // Posted in General, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  No Comments

ieMicrosoft is ending it’s support for Internet Explorer 8, 9, and 10 next week on January 12th.

Microsoft will be releasing a final patch and encouraging users to upgrade to one of the company’s more recent browsers (11 or Edge).

The end of support means that these older versions of Internet Explorer will no longer receive security updates or technical support, making anyone who uses them much more vulnerable to hackers.

The last patch will deliver a few bug fixes, as well as announcing the  “End of Life” notification telling users to upgrade to IE 11 or Microsoft Edge. But Windows XP and Vista users will not be able to upgrade to either as they will not work with XP or Vista, more incentive to upgrade XP and Vista installations which have already seen ‘End of Life”.

There are thought to still be several hundred million users using soon to be obsolete versions of Internet Explorer. Those users are about to put their systems into security risk state.

Installing VB6 on Windows 7

July 10, 2013 // Posted in Computer Tips, Main (Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ) |  1 Comment

I know this post is not about PHP but I feel it may me useful to someone.

VB6

VB6

Microsoft say that you can only install VB6 on Win7 in a virtual machine in XP Mode. That is an issue if you do not have Win 7 Ultimate or Professional as XP Mode is not available for Windows 7 Home.

So here’s how to get it running on Win 7.

I have tested this on Win7 32 Bit, and know others that have also installed successfully on 64Bit.

Please Note: It will not work on Windows 8 as VB6 support has been removed from Windows 8.

    • Start by creating a zero-byte file in C:\Windows called MSJAVA.DLL. To do this create a text file in notepad with nothing in it and save it in a folder with the name MSJAVA.DLL. Then browse to the file, copy it and paste it in c:/windows, click Yes to the prompt to use administrator privileges.
    • Next turn off User Access control. To do this go to control panel, click System Security, then Click Change User Account Control Settings, move the slider right down to the bottom and click OK.
    • Insert your VB6 CD and click the view files (do not auto-run) and browse to the setup.exe, right click it and select Run As Administrator. You will get various incompatibility messages just ignore them and continue.
    • Select Custom Setup and check the boxes against:
      • Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0
      • ActiveX
      • Data Access
      • Graphics
      Only the above.
    • Next browse to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio\VB98\ and find the vb6.exe file. Right click it and select properties. Go to the Compatibility tab and select the following only:
      • Run this program in compatibility mode for Windows XP (Service Pack 3)
      • Disable Visual Themes
      • Disable Desktop Composition
      • Disable display scaling on high DPI settings
    • Install the Service Pack 6, again by right clicking the setup.exe file and selecting Run as Administrator.
    • Finally as there may be some registration issues for some ocx’s download and run the vb6 runtime for Win7  (available from Microsoft here)
    • Switch User access Control Back on.
    • You are now good to go.
    • Enjoy.

I hope that is useful to someone

Steve

Some information for this post was gleaned from http://www.fortypoundhead.com/showcontent.asp?artid=20502, thanks to fortypoundhead.

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